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Malachite – false emerald from copper mines

Malachite - false emerald from copper mines

Malachite – false emerald from copper mines


Semiprecious stones are famous not only for their incomparable color, brilliance, crystalline form, but also for that divine aura that allows to consider them a miracle.
Despite the fact that today minerals have been thoroughly studied even at the atomic level, they, like thousands of years ago, remain a mystery to us. The Ural malachite is a Russian gemstone with tremendous esoteric properties. Modern esotericists claim that malachite has an exceptional ability to take negative energy, clearing the surrounding space. But the stone should be periodically cleaned. Otherwise, the negative energy accumulated in it can be harmful. That is why it is not recommended to wear malachite jewelry, previously owned by the sick people.

The color of malachite depends on the compounds of copper and can vary from emerald green to black-green. The name “malachite” comes from the Greek malache – “mallow”, and points to the deep green color of this mineral.
Even in ancient times, with the help of malachite, heart and lung diseases were treated. In lithotherapy centers malachite is used to treat impotence. It has long been noted that a woman who has jewelry with malachite, even if she is not too good-looking, will always attract a man to her.
The ancient Egyptians knew and valued the malachite. The green stone, which from time to time was found in the copper mines of Arabia and the Sinai Peninsula, was dedicated to the goddess Isis. It served as a favorite material for figurines, and malachite powder was used as a cosmetic.
Since ancient times, in Egypt, malachite had been used to produce copper. If malachite is heated, it turns black.
In the first quarter of the XIX century, the miners and serfs managed to find the only malachite deposits of their kind in the Urals. The owners of the mines – the famous Demidovs – offered the Russian Tsar Nicholas I to buy a stone for decorating the Winter Palace, which burned down during the fire of 1837, as well as for the interior of the then-constructed St. Isaac’s Cathedral.
Nikolai Demidov (1773-1828) took malachite from Russia on his ship through Toulon to Paris, Rome, Florence, Naples. In these cities, dozens of stone-cutting workshops made hundreds of jewelry and mosaic items for sale. In the first decades of the XIX century N. Demidov was the owner of the richest collection of malachite things.
The Hermitage has at least 800 items made from the Urals malachite, including grandiose malachite vases and countertops.
This mineral is also mined in Kazakhstan, Germany, Africa, Australia, and America.

Malachite – false emerald from copper mines